Friday, May 20, 2011

living loveliness- give the mundane it's beautiful due

For some reason Blogger lost my most recent post last week, so here it is in case you missed it:



The big things come so quietly, these secrets we must stop everything to hear.  To here.  The big thing?  It is no more than the next thing.  This holy work; it is in the details, the slowness, the rhythm.

Two years ago I wrote a post called May Flowers, about the happy season of busy that I was experiencing.  "The earth is scattered too", I wrote. "for right now, maybe too much is okay."

My youngest then had reached the stage that the baby is now, fourteen months or so, the time when they begin to feel more like a child and less like a baby, and with each of my children at this age I have experienced the feeling of raising my head, looking around, getting reacquainted with the world and myself again.  The nausea and exhaustion of pregnancy have passed, the sleepless months of newborn, the post-partum, the family growing pains and adjustments.  Life feels once more as life as usual, and without realizing it I find myself thinking about what's next.  I didn't know, two years ago, that what came next was a third child (though now I am so unspeakably grateful), and so at the time I was throwing my energy into plans and dreams; a part-time job, a new writing venture, and a small business with a friend.  It was a thrilling time for me, and then it all came to a screeching halt when I became pregnant and I braced myself for another round of hyperemesis.

Along with the fear of being sick was this selfish stubbornness that didn't want to give up the many things I was doing that seemed so important.

This time, it's different.  This time I find myself clinging to this fragile limb, wanting just to remain here, to be present and aware, to notice what is unfolding right in front of me.  I don't want to miss anything about where I am right now.  To love deeply and be deeply grateful.  To pay attention.

It seems to be the theme of what I am reading and learning, from people like Ann and BerryRuth who survived the earthquake and blogs about how she clings to what is real on the the other side of tragedy.

It's really not about whether to work or not work, to be on facebook or not be on facebook, all questions that I wrestle with.  I think it's more about being present, wherever you are.  To value people- every person- to treat people with great tenderness and compassion.  I think it's about bringing redemption to whatever you are doing; the slow, honest, quietly unfolding kind of redemption.

As the children grow and my world opens up just a little I am content to stay right here.  I want to live carefully and quietly, reverently; whatever that means.  I am learning to give the mundane it's beautiful due.

Yes, our lives are sewn on occasion with a texture of joy unmistakeable, the foretastes. But many days, if not most hours, reek of repetition, a mundane rising and falling punctuated with what the old hymn writer penned as 'seasons of distress and grief.' The relief you are charged to bring to our souls in times like these is beauty - nothing more, nothing less. It is your only duty. Give up all other ambitions for the dross they are. Give the mundane its beautiful due. at Dirty Shame

7 comments:

Fijufic said...

95% of success is simply showing up. In the case of your children you always have time.

There will come a day where your time together will be even more precious and scarce.

You have a beautiful soul. My Indian friends would tell me that you possess an old soul. This is a great compliment.

Love,
Bobby

Jenny P. said...

Makes me think of this quote... one of my favorites.

“Anyone who imagines that bliss is normal is going to waste a lot of time running around shouting that he has been robbed. The fact is that most putts don’t drop, most beef is tough, most children grow up to be just like people, most successful marriages require a high degree of mutual toleration, and most jobs are more often dull than otherwise. Life is just like an old time rail journey … delays, sidetracks, smoke, dust, cinders, and jolts, interspersed only occasionally by beautiful vistas and thrilling bursts of speed. The trick is to thank the Lord for letting you have the ride.” _Gordon B. Hinckely

Misha Leigh. said...

this is so lovely...

nana said...

My mother told me she worried too much about the house and things that didn't really matter. I had already decided I was going to spend my time with my children but I still had a clean house it just wasn't my big focus.

As you can imagine when i found out I was having twins and Amanda would be 22 or 23 months when they were born I was scared. How was I going to handle all this? My husband traveled and I did not have family close who could come and help me. This was not what I had planned.

It turned out to be a gift in so many ways. I found I could handle all that mattered. I could feed them and keep them in clean clothes and most important I could love them and show them I loved them.

I learned much from my children. I learned unconditional love from my children because that is what I got even if I didn't always deserve it. I loved watching them play and interact. Those years when my children were little and at home with ME will always be some of the happiest times of my life.

Life does not stand still. I have regrets about the way I handled somethings but I do not dwell on those. Now, as I watch my children with their children I know I did alot right. They are all three loving parents. Two of them call sometimes to discuss the best way to deal with things. I think they know I am not telling them what to do just give suggestions and encourage them. The other lets me give suggestions without getting insulted.

Life gets so busy as they grow so I say YES enjoy the mundane of life today. Soak in as much as you can because it will not come again.

Jo@Mylestones said...

"To value people- every person- to treat people with great tenderness and compassion. I think it's about bringing redemption to whatever you are doing; the slow, honest, quietly unfolding kind of redemption.

As the children grow and my world opens up just a little I am content to stay right here. I want to live carefully and quietly, reverently; whatever that means. I am learning to give the mundane it's beautiful due."

Forgive me for practically quoting your entire post in the comments, but I just had to highlight this and say: you have articulated (beautifully!) exactly what I want to do/be too. I am surprised at how content I feel and how much meaning I find in this quiet, unnoticed and yes--even mundane--existence.

Fijufic said...

I read it last week. Beautiful as ever...I love your outlook on life.

charrette said...

Mmmmm...love that quote! It makes me feel so much better about how I spend my days!